US embassy cable - 01ABUJA2561

TFUS01: NIGERIA: WORKING TOGETHER TO FIGHT TERRORISM

Identifier: 01ABUJA2561
Wikileaks: View 01ABUJA2561 at Wikileaks.org
Origin: Embassy Abuja
Created: 2001-10-11 10:09:00
Classification: SECRET
Tags: PREL PTER PARM NI
Redacted: This cable was not redacted by Wikileaks.
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.

S E C R E T ABUJA 002561 
 
SIPDIS 
 
 
E.O. 12958: DECL: 08/10/2011 
TAGS: PREL, PTER, PARM, NI 
SUBJECT: TFUS01: NIGERIA: WORKING TOGETHER TO FIGHT 
TERRORISM 
 
REF: A. STATE 170698 
     B. ABUJA 2560 
 
 
(U) Classified by Ambassador Howard F. Jeter; Reasons 1.5 (b) 
and (d). 
 
 
1. (S) As agreed during the October 8 meeting between the 
Ambassador and the National Security Advisor (Ref B), 
PolMilOff met October 9 with LTC Mohammed Idris, the NSA's 
Military Advisor and Mohammed K. Ibrahim, Assistant Director 
for International Organizations at the Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs, to present Ref A demarche.  (Both Idris and Ibrahim 
planned to brief their respective bosses shortly thereafter.) 
 Ibrahim remarked the evidence was strong though 
circumstantial, but he agreed when Idris mentioned there was 
surely sensitive and more compelling information that could 
not be shared.  Ibrahim stated Nigeria was pleased to be 
among the countries to receive a call from the White House 
before the strikes is Afghanistan began.  PolMilOff replied 
that the U.S. saw Nigeria as a partner and expected it to 
take the lead against terrorism in Africa, particularly in 
the sub-region. 
 
 
2. (C) PolMilOff also passed Ibrahim and Idris a copy of a 
matrix showing the ratification status for ECOWAS states of 
multilateral counter-terrorism protocols, and emphasized that 
ratification of pending protocols by West African states 
would advance the international effort.  Here again Nigeria 
could take a leadership role.  Looking at international 
efforts, Ibrahim contended the U.S. should revisit its 
opposition to restrictions on small arms sales to non-state 
actors at the UN Small Arms Conference, implying that the 
U.S. should reconsider its position.  Small arms are often 
used by terrorists and are a significant threat in Africa. 
 
 
3. (C) Ibrahim noted that a similar Islamic school system 
exists in Nigeria as the Madrasas in Pakistan, and emphasized 
that poverty and education must be addressed as part of the 
campaign.  Idris agreed, fearing that the poor and ignorant 
in Nigeria (and in other African countries) were susceptible 
to the appeal of radical groups. 
 
 
4. (S) COMMENT: Ibrahim and Idris both appeared convinced of 
the justification for U.S. actions against Al-Qa'ida and the 
Taliban, and hopefully will convey this sense to their bosses 
and other Nigerian policy-makers.  If so, the demarche would 
have proven to be useful in consolidating our support here. 
END COMMENT. 
Jeter 

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